Team

Dr.  Hannah Schürenberg-Frosch

Wissenschaftliche Assistentin

Dr. Hannah Schürenberg-Frosch

Lebenslauf:

Ausführliches CV unter diesem Link

Akademische Ausbildung

  • Februar 2012: Promotion, Dr. rer. pol, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Dissertation: Development aid and public investment programs in Sub-Sahara Africa - Modeling aid-financed investment in infrastructure and education and estimation relevant parameters.

    2007-2011: Promotionsstudentin, Universität Duisburg-Essen

  •  September 2007 : Master of Arts in Volkswirtschaftslehre, Masterarbeit: Scaling up Aid to Africa - A CGE analysis for Zambia 

  • Oktober 2005 - August 2007 : Universität Duisburg-Essen: Masterstudium in Volkswirtschaftslehre

  • September 2005: Bachelor of Arts in International Business Studies (with Thesis) 

  • Oktober 2002 - September 2005 : Universität Paderborn: Bachelorstudium in International Business Studies, Englisch und Französisch

Summer Schools:

  • September 2008: 4th Ruhr Graduate Summer School: Economic Modeling with GAMS/MPSGE - Energy and Climate Modeling.
  • September 2007: 3rd Ruhr Graduate Summer School: Computable General Equilibrium Models with GAMS/MPSGE 
  • Juli 2008: Kiel Summer School on Economic Policy: Development Policy

Berufserfahrung

  • Seit August 2014: Akademische Rätin am  am Lehrstuhl für Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen von Prof. Dr. Volker Clausen, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Campus Essen

  • 2012-2015: Lehrbeauftragte Hochschule Neuss für Internationale Wirtschaft im Fach "International Commodity Trade"
  • Oktober 2007-Juli 2014: Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Lehrstuhl für Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen von Prof. Dr. Volker Clausen, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Campus Essen  (Elternzeit Mai 2013-April 2014)

  • April 2007  – September 2007: Wissenschaftliche Hilfskraft am Lehrstuhl von Prof. Dr. Volker Clausen, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Campus Essen 

  • Januar 2007 - August 2007: Studentische Hilfskraft am Lehrstuhl für Statistik und Ökonometrie von Prof. Dr. Walter Assenmacher, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Campus Essen 

Ehrungen und Auszeichnungen:

  • 2011: Featured paper at the GTAP conference 2011 in Venice, Italy
  • 2012: DAAD-Scholarship for conference participation in Geneva, Switzerland
  • 2014: Grant for excellent young researchers of the research commitee of the University of Duisburg-Essen
  • 2015: DAAD-Scholarship for conference participation in Melbourne, Australia

Forschungsgebiete:

  • Berechenbare angewandte allgemeine Gleichgewichtsmodelle (mit GAMS)
  • Höhe und Determinanten von Armington-Elastizitäten
  • Wirtschaftliche Entwicklung in Sub-Sahara Afrika
  • Biokraftstoffstrategien für afrikanische Staaten
  • Entwicklungszusammenarbeit und Effektivität der Entwicklungshilfe
  • Öffentliche Investitionen

Projekte:

Work in Progress:

  • Assessment of the impact of misspecification of Armington elasticities in CGE models
  • Estimation of Armington elasticities for a wide range of countries
  • Determinants of structural differences in estimated Armington elasticities
  • The effects of small-scale usage of vegetable oil in rural communities in Zambia (together with Dr. Linda Kleeman, IfW Kiel)
  • Modeling the effect of CDM-like investment on the receiving economy (together with Iva Hristova)

Completed:

  • Sectoral and distributional effects of increased aid flows to Africa - Results from CGE models
  • Effects from increased budgetary support in Zambia (in cooperation with AIID; www.aiid.org/page.php)
  • Modeling public investment in developing country CGE models
  • The effects of rural roads infrastructure in African countries - theoretical and empirical contribution
  • The effects of better schooling on the labor market in African economies

Publikationen:

Filter:
  • Olekseyuk, Z.; Schürenberg-Frosch, H.: Are Armington Elasticities Different Across Aountries and Sectors? A European Study. In: Economic Modelling (2016) Nr. 55, S. 328-342. Volltext RIS Download Details
  • Schuerenberg-Frosch, H.: How To Model A Child In School? - A Dynamic Macrosimulation Study For Tanzania. In: South African Journal of Economics, Jg. 83 (2015) Nr. 1, S. 117-139. doi:10.1111/saje.12042 Volltext RIS Download Details
  • Olekseyuk, Z.; Schürenberg-Frosch, H.: Are Armington Elasticites Different Across Countries and Sectors? - A European Study. In: Ruhr Economic Papers (2014) Nr. 513. Volltext RIS Download Details
  • Schuerenberg-Frosch, H.: Improving Africa’s Roads: - Modelling Infrastructure Investment and Its Effect on Sectoral Production Behaviour. In: Development Policy Review, Jg. 32 (2014) Nr. 3. RIS Download Details
  • Clausen, V.; Schürenberg-Frosch, H.: Aid, Spending Strategies and Productivity Effects - A Multi-Sectoral CGE-Analysis for Zambia. In: Economic Modelling, Jg. 29 (2012), S. 2254-2268. RIS Download Details
  • Clausen V.; Schürenberg-Frosch, H.: Private Consumption and Cyclical Asymmetries in the Euro Area. In: Intereconomics, Jg. 47 (2012) Nr. 3, S. 190-196. RIS Download Details
  • Schürenberg-Frosch, H.: Development aid and public investment programs in Sub-Sahara Africa - Modeling aid-financed investment in infrastructure and education and estimating relevant parameters (1). Universität Duisburg-Essen, Essen 2012. RIS Download Details

    From the perspective of Sub-Saharan Africa, the history of developmental aid is mostly a recollection of drawbacks and failures, although few success stories can be told as well. Over the last thirty years, many countries have received abundant developmental assistance, yet they are still struggling to reach adequate levels of human development. Many researchers, journalists and politicians, both from Africa and the Western countries, call for a substantial reformulation and reform of the international development aid framework. Consequently, research on the effects of developmental aid is crucial in the process of designing an informed new development agenda. At the same time it is important to understand how additional investments could operate and which effects are probable or possible for each of the specific fields. Additional indirect effects, may they be positive or negative, should be taken into account.

    This dissertation aims at providing insights into the aspects listed above by integrating development assistance and sector development programs into adequate economy-wide models for Sub-Saharan African states. The Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) methodology belongs to the standard toolkit of economic policy consulting. This thesis comprises three different CGE models complemented by an econometric study. The models elaborate on various aspects of aid-financed development programs. The here-presented models are an important contribution to the respective modeling literature and add detail to their existing counterparts, especially in regards to the modeling of government behavior and the endogenous households' skill choice for their child members. The third model is a recursive-dynamic model which integrates educational production as well as the choice between child labor supply and schooling.

    The second chapter in this dissertation focuses on the direct spending effect resulting from development aid being paid to the government of an African state. It investigates whether so called Dutch Disease effects from aid are possible and probable, yet it goes beyond the Dutch Disease literature. The model and the analysis distinguish between different aid-spending strategies on the one hand and the possible second-round effect on productivity on the other. The paper presents an application of the model to Zambia and subsequently incorporates the notion of enclave sectors in the economy (which is often the case in countries with large natural resources). Of the following three chapters each concentrates on distinctive areas where development aid might be invested in a way that fosters productivity.

    Chapter three shows how the effects of infrastructure improvements can be explicitly captured in a CGE model setup. In contrast to many other studies, the paper depicts infrastructure as a transport cost-reducing element which improves market access by providing a low cost alternative to transportation services. The paper emphasizes the positive effect of an improved road network for market access, as well as its effects on home consumption and small-scale farming.

    Chapter four extends the econometric analysis of infrastructure in the third chapter and elaborates further on the econometric relationship between transport costs and the status of the road network. The paper combines input-output data, road network data, meteorological as well as geographical data in order to analyze the key factors determining transport costs across countries in a pooled estimation. The paper contributes to the transportation literature by developing and applying a new measure for transport costs. Noteworthy differences between developed and developing countries are identified, which leads to the conclusion that evidence on the success of road network projects in industrialized countries cannot be easily transferred to the developing countries.

    The last paper explores yet another important area of development policy: educational policy. It embeds the labor force effects from increased enrollment under different circumstances within a very detailed recursive-dynamic CGE model. The main advancement, as compared to other CGE studies in this field, lies in the explicit modeling of the educational process itself. The model carefully considers the short term requirements in terms of skilled staff and physical schooling facilities, which require financing in order to increase enrollment, as well as the long term effects of the above on skilled labor provision. Moreover, the paper looks into the trade-off between current foregone earnings from child labor and future possible returns from higher education, doing so by including child labor into the model.

  • Clausen, V.; Schürenberg-Frosch, H.: Unterschiedliche nationale Konsumfunktionen als Quelle konjunktureller Asymmetrien in Europa?. In: Hendrik Schröder; Volker Clausen; Andreas Behr (Hrsg.): Essener Beiträge zur empirischen Wirtschaftsforschung. Springer Gabler, 2012, S. 53-74. RIS Download Details
  • Schuerenberg-Frosch, H.: One Model Fits All? - Determinants of Transport Costs Across Sectors and Country Groups, University of Göttingen (Hrsg.), CEGE Discussion Paper, 2011. RIS Download Details
  • Schuerenberg-Frosch, H.: Improving on Africa's Roads - Modeling Infrastructure Investment and its Effect on Subsistence Agriculture, Research Commitee for Development Economics, Verein für Socialpolitik (Hrsg.), Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Kiel 2010. RIS Download Details
  • Clausen, V.; Schürenberg-Frosch, H.: Aid, Spending Strategies and Productivity Effects - A Multi-Sectoral CGE-Analysis for Zambia, Ruhr Economic Papers, Essen 2009. (ISBN 978-3-86788-142-5) RIS Download Details

    Numerous econometric studies fail to detect a signicant and robust relationship
    between international aid and economic growth in the recipient countries.
    Dutch Disease effects might be responsible for this result.This paper examines
    the relation between aid and its effectiveness in a multi-sector multihousehold
    Computable General Equilibrium (CGE)-framework. Given that
    international transfers to African countries increasingly take the form of general
    financial support to the government, different spending strategies and
    their macroeconomic, sectoral and distributional effects are evaluated in a
    two-stage simulation making a distinction between immediate direct effects
    and possible long-run effects from increased productivity. While the model
    simulates the effects of additional aid in Zambia it can be used as a blueprint
    for other African countries.

Tagungen:

  • 10. Göttinger Workshop "Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen": "Sectoral and distributional
    effects of increased aid flows to Africa - A CGE analysis for Zambia", 11. April 2008.
  • 3rd Development Conference of the GRES, Université Bordeaux IV: "Aid, Spending Strategies and Sectoral Reallocation - A multi-sectoral CGE analysis for Zambia", 12. Juni 2009.
  • Jahrestagung des Vereins für Socialpolitik, 9.-11.9.2009: "Aid, Spending Strategis and Productivity Effects - A multi-sectoral CGE analysis for Zambia."
  • 12. Göttinger Workshop "Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen": "Improving on Africa's Roads - Modeling Infrastructure Investment and its effect on Subsistence Agriculture", 26.02.2010. Paper
  • Spring Meeting of Young Economists, Luxemburg, 15. - 17.04.2010: "Improving on Africa's Roads - Modeling Infrastructure Investment and its effect on Subsistence Agriculture", 15.04.2010. 
  • Jahrestagung des Entwicklungsländer-Ausschusses des Vereins für Socialpolitik, Hannover, 18. - 19.6.2010: "Improving on Africa's Roads - Modeling Infrastructure Investment and its effect on Subsistence Agriculture", 19.06.2010.
  • 13. Göttinger Workshop "Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen": "One Model fits all? Analyzing the determinants of transport costs across countries", 16.-18.3.2011, Göttingen, Paper
  • Annual Conference of the Irish Economic Association: "One Model fits all? Analyzing the determinants of transport costs across countries", 14.-16.4.2011, Limerick, Irland, Paper
  • 14th Annual Conference on Global Economic Analysis (GTAP Conference): "Improving on Africa's Roads - Modeling the effects of public investment in infrastructure on sectoral production.", 16.-18.06.2011, Venedig, Italien. Paper
  • angenommen: Nordic Conference on Development Economics: "Aid, Spending Strategies and Productivity Effects - A multi-sectoral CGE analysis for Zambia", Kopenhagen, Dänemark, 20.-21.06.2011
  • 15th Annual Conference on Global Economic Analysis (GTAP Conference): "How to model a child in school - A dynamic macro-simulation study for Tanzania", 27.-29.06.2012, Genf, Schweiz. Paper
  • 18th Annual Conference on Global Economic Analysis (GTAP Conference): "We couldn't care less about Armington Elasticities - But should we?", 24.-26.06.2015, Melbourne, Australia. Paper

Lehrveranstaltungen:

  • Bachelor-Kurse:
    • Makroökonomik I
    • Makroökonomik II
    • Seminar: Globalisierung - Die Bedeutung Chinas in der Weltwirtschaft 
    • Seminar: Europa im Fokus
    • Einführung in die Wachstumstheorie
    • Einführung in die Entwicklungsökonomik
  • Master-Kurse:
    • Theorie und Empirie internationaler Kapitallokation
    • Quantitative Modelle internationaler Wirtschaftsbeziehungen
    • Seminar: "Ökonometrische Modelle Internationaler Wirtschaftsbeziehungen"

Mitgliedschaften:

  • European Economic Association
  • Verein für Socialpolitik
  • Alumni WIWI Essen

Inneruniversitäre Funktionen:

  • Modulverantwortliche für das Modul Auslandsstudium im Studiengang Volkswirtschaftslehre (2011-2013, ab WS 2015/2016)
  • Mitglied der Auwahlkommission für den Master VWL der Fakultät für Wirtschaftswissenschaften (bis WS 2012/2013)
  • Mitglied im Vorstand des IBES (Institut for Business and Economic Studies) der Fakultät für Wirtschaftswissenschaften (bis SS 2013)
  • Mitglied in der Studienbeitragskommission des IBES / QVM-Kommission bis SS 2013

Weitere Funktionen:

  • Gutachtertätigkeit für:
    • Applied Economics Quarterly
    • South African Journal of Economics
    • World Development
    • International Economics and Economic Policy
    • Emerging Markets, Finance and Trade
    • Economic Systems